FAQ – LFC

This page lists some of the frequently asked questions for the LFC. To get a complete list of FAQ, please fill in the form at the bottom and one of our representatives will contact you shortly.

1 Functionality

  1. 1
    Is the LFC chopping or grinding up the waste food?

    No, the LFC is mixing the new waste food with the old waste food and the Powerzymes (microorganisms). The waste food is decomposed and primarily produces water, CO2, and heat. If waste food is chopped or ground, small parts of undigested food will enter the exit stream, increasing the levels of TSS (total suspended solids) and BOD (biological oxygen demand). The motor on the LFC acts only to mix, or slowly stir, the waste. It runs only a quarter of the time which minimizes the use of electricity.

  2. 2
    Is the LFC a batch process?

    No. You add waste food at any time. The machine is constantly digesting the waste.

  3. 3
    Does the LFC smell?

    No. The decomposition is an aerobic process (in the presence of oxygen). In a forest, the leaves from the trees fall on the floor and decompose in an aerobic manner. The forest doesn’t smell. The same process is used in the LFC, but we accelerate it significantly.

  4. 4
    What is the Powerzyme? Is it safe?

    We offer two types of Powerzyme: liquid and dry (powder). Mostly, we provide the liquid Powerzyme as it is lower cost and can last longer. We provide the powder Powerzyme exclusively for exports to certain countries and also where the customer has special requirements for the digestion of the waste food. They are both safe. See also question 13.7 and question 13.8.

  5. 5
    What happens to the decomposed foods?

    They exit the LFC as nutrient rich grey water. You normally put this down the drain.

  6. 6
    Can we use the output of the LFC as fertilizer to irrigate the land?

    Possibly. If you feed the machine with only waste from the preparation of fruits and vegetables, then what comes out of the LFC could be used to irrigate the land. It is rich in nutrients just as if you had composted the waste food in a more traditional manner. It will then make an ideal fertilizer. However, if the waste food has meats, fats, grease, and spices such as salt and peppers, the output may not be suitable. You should test the output to see if you can use it. In any case, you need to filter the output before you can use it. See Power Knot’s application note on this.

2 Weighing the waste food

  1. 1
    How does the LFC weigh the amount of waste food?

    There are load cells mounted on each corner of the LFC. These weigh the total weight of the LFC. On installation the software calibrates itself so it knows the empty weight. From there, the software knows how much is in the LFC and how much is added each time.

  2. 2
    How does this help the operator?

    The LFC reports when it is safe to add more waste food. It does this with text on the touch screen and with an LED (green means ok; yellow means wait, and red means overloaded).

  3. 3
    How does this help our company?

    You can see the amount of waste that is ingested by the hour, day, week, month, and year. This is also converted by the LFC to report the amount of CO2 equivalent that is diverted from the landfill. 1. This feature has a patent pending. (Liquid Food Composter)

  4. 4
    How accurate are these measurements?

    On an LFC that is properly installed and calibrated, the results are better than ±1% accuracy. The LFC-500 can detect something as small as an orange when it is added to the drum. The LFC-3000 can resolve 1 kg (2 lb).

  5. 5
    How far back can I see the data?

    The LFC stores the data for 24 months.

  6. 6
    Can I access this data remotely?

    Yes. See section 11 for details.

3 Choosing the Right Size of LFC

  1. 1
    Power Knot offers eight different sizes of LFCs. How do we determine what size of LFC to buy?

    Weigh the waste every day and make a record of it. Alternatively, weigh the waste food on Saturday, Monday, and Wednesday if you can’t weigh it every day for a week. Take an average. Also, the capacity of a machine is based on the duration of your working day. If you add the same amount of waste food at regular intervals over an 18 hour day you will need a smaller machine than if you dispose of the same amount of waste food over an eight hour day.

  2. 2
    If we determine that we have a certain amount of waste each day, but it fluctuates, what should we buy?

    Buy an LFC that has the daily capacity equal to the maximum waste you have any day. For example, suppose you have the following average waste per day: In this case, you should buy an LFC-200 (with a nominal daily capacity of 200 kg) even though the average waste is 105 kg per day. See also question 6.6 on page 9, question 6.7 on page 9, and question 6.12 on page 10.

  3. 3
    We anticipate our business will grow over the next few years. Can we buy a larger machine today than we currently need?

    Yes. Buy some extra Powerchips to fill partially the extra space. Remove these as the amount of your waste food increases. You need the amount of waste food and Powerchips to be above the shaft of the arm inside the LFC. Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 100 kg 0 kg 53 kg 67 kg 90 kg 220 kg 205 kg (Liquid Food Composter)

  4. 4
    If the amount of waste fluctuates much more than shown in question 3.2, can we still use an LFC? For example, suppose we have a very small amount of waste most days but one day a week we have much waste. What size LFC should we use?

    Again, determine the size by the largest daily amount. For example, suppose you have the following average waste per day: In this case, you should buy an LFC-200 (with a nominal daily capacity of 200 kg) even though the average waste is 33 kg per day.

  5. 5
    Suppose our usage is even more sporadic than that described in question 3.4?

    When you add waste infrequently like this, the colony of microorganisms starts to die when there is no food. This is not a problem usually if the capacity of the LFC is used no less frequently than once a week as shown in the table above in question 3.4. However, if the capacity is used less often, there may be insufficient microorganisms to digest the waste in this case, you must expect to add more Powerzyme more frequently than described in question 12.4 on page 21. You can keep the Powerzyme in a spray bottle and spray it into the LFC each time you have added a large amount of waste. You should also plan to supplement the Powerzyme with half of the regular amount every three months.

4 Installation

  1. 1
    Where do we install the LFC?

    The LFC is intended to be installed in the kitchen. This is where the majority of waste food is accumulated and it is therefore more convenient to easily dispose of the waste.

  2. 2
    Space in a kitchen is at a premium. Is footprint an issue for these machines?

    The typical machine is the size of a desk or a chest freezer. You may find that you eliminate large buckets of waste food that you accumulate during the day because the waste food now goes directly into the machine. If you eliminate several such buckets, you’ve got the room for the LFC.

  3. 3
    Can we install the LFC outside?

    We do not recommend it. If you must install it outside, it must be under a cover and protected from the elements (rain, snow, and dirt). It must also be in a location that does not get hot and does not freeze. The maximum ambient air temperature is 35°C (95°F) and the minimum ambient air temperature is 4°C (39°F). Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 kg 0 kg 5 kg 6 kg 3 kg 10 kg 205 kg (Liquid Food Composter)

  4. 4
    Does the LFC have a heater so we can install the LFC in a cold climate?

    The LFC has a heater, but this is to start the digestion process (or aid when it goes slow) and not necessarily to compensate for a colder climate. The digestion process is exothermic and when progressing well this keeps the drum temperature about 42°C (108°F). The drum is insulated so it retains this heat well. The default temperature of the heater is 27°C (81°F) and is used to warm the drum initially and when you add cold foods to the LFC. If you install the LFC in a cool climate (below 20°C (68°F)) the rate of digestion may be slower and you may need a larger sized LFC to compensate. See also section 9 on page 15.

  5. 5
    What space do we need around the LFC for maintenance and access?

    Ideally: back: 0; left and right sides 1.5 m (5’) (for maintenance); front 2 m (6’) (for maintenance and adding waste food). Possible: left side 0.5 m (1’); right side 1 m (3’); front 1.5 m (5’).

  6. 6
    What are the basic requirements for installation?

    You need hot and cold water (or only hot water or only cold water), a floor drain, and electricity. The LFC-50, LFC-70, and LFC-100 use single phase power, the larger machines use three phase power. See also section 9 on page 15. Although it is not mandatory, we strongly recommend connecting the LFC to the internet. See also section 10 on page 19. Outlet pipe slopes downward Grade level drain AC power input Water supplies Firm level ground LFC (Liquid Food Composter)

  7. 7
    Does the grey water clog the grease trap?

    No. On the contrary, the grey water discharged from the LFC contains microorganisms that will digest the grease that is in the trap. The grey water contains very little grease or fat because that is digested inside the machine. Although the use of the LFC will not obviate the need to clean the grease trap, it should increase the time between the cleanings.

  8. 8
    Are any special permits necessary to use the LFC?

    Usually not. The LFC connects like a dishwasher. It is more sanitary than a dishwasher and is safe to be installed in the kitchen. However, you should check with your local municipality to see if they require special permits for the use of a bio-digester.

  9. 9
    Does Power Knot have LFCs for use where the ac mains voltage is 240 V instead of 110 V?

    Yes, we have designed our LFCs for use globally. Our three smaller machines support 240 V single phase and the four larger LFCs require 415 V three phase. The voltages are listed on our web site. Scroll down to Sizes, and click on USA Units or ROW Units.

5 Purchase

  1. 1
    How much do the LFCs cost?

    $16k to $260k depending on the size of the LFC. Contact your authorized distributor for latest pricing on a particular model. If there is not an authorized distributor in your region, contact Power Knot directly.

  2. 2
    Can we buy the LFC outright?

    Yes.

  3. 3
    Where does the product ship from?

    Power Knot carries stock and ships from Silicon Valley, California. Our international offices and authorized international distributors also carry stock.

  4. 4
    When we order an LFC, do we need to buy the Powerchips and Powerzyme separately?

    New machines come with the correct amount of Powerzyme (microorganisms) and Powerchips (bio-chips). You should not need any more Powerzyme for about nine months and you don’t need to replace the Powerchips for about three years.

  5. 5
    Is leasing available for the LFC?

    For sales in the USA, Power Knot have pre-approved leases on these machines with a reputable financial company. They can offer attractive terms and based on the needs of the customer they can tailor the lease in several different ways. For a machine that processes up to 770 lb of waste food per day the approximate lease price is approximately $850 per month (for four years). For sales outside the USA, please contact the authorized distributor for your territory or region.

  6. 6
    Can we rent the LFC?

    Yes; Power Knot rents the LFCs to fully qualified customers. The minimal rental period is five years, there is a deposit of three months’ rent due on signing the rental agreement, the first month’s rental is prepaid, and freight must be prepaid prior to shipping. (Liquid Food Composter)

6 Daily Usage

  1. 1
    Is the machine easy to use?

    Yes; the operator opens the door, puts in the waste, and closes the door. The operator doesn’t need to press an switches before or after this. Also, you do not need to adjust the control panel in normal usage.

  2. 2
    How often can we put waste food into the LFC?

    The machine operates continuously and you add waste food at any time. You can feed the machine 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. However, we recommend you add waste food no more frequently than every 30 minutes. This allows the machine adequate time to start the digestion of the last batch.

  3. 3
    Does the LFC require supervision?

    No. You open the door, put in the waste, and close the door. The machine pauses operation while the door is open and resumes operation automatically without intervention. With the larger LFCs (with a bin tipper) the operator puts the bin in place, and activates the lift process. The LFC opens the door automatically, tips in the contents, closes the door, and returns the bin for the operator to remove it.

  4. 4
    Do we need to add waste only in certain mixtures, such as breads and meats?

    No. Just put in the waste that you have, whatever the composition of that waste.

  5. 5
    Do we need to mix the waste with any other item, such as sawdust?

    No. You add nothing to the waste before putting it into the drum and you do not need to ensure a specific mixture of waste.

  6. 6
    Would I be able to load the LFC’s maximum capacity in a single batch?

    No. The maximum you can load is 80% of the nominal capacity. But we recommend that you usually add no more than 70% of the capacity. If your process permits only being able to add waste in one batch, buy a larger machine. For example, if you want to dispose of 200 kg per day in a single batch, buy an LFC-300 (with a nominal capacity of 300 kg). 70% of 300 kg is 210 kg so this can go into the machine once per day.

7 Types of Waste Food

  1. 1
    What waste food can be fed into the machine?

    Anything that can go in your stomach can go into the LFC. The Powerzyme is designed to digest a mixture of waste foods comprising fruit, vegetables, cheese, breads, fish, and meat. Chop larger items like the heads of pineapple, and watermelons as digestion will occur at a faster rate. (See the figure on the next page.)

  2. 2
    What waste cannot be fed into the machine?

    The following organic materials cannot be fed into the machine: shells such as oyster and mussel, corn husks, large bones, stones such as those from avocado and peach, and liquid oils and fats. The following inorganic materials cannot be fed into the machine: paper (including napkins), china, glass, plastic, rubber, cutlery, and any chemicals. You must also minimize organic materials that are very fibrous, such as corn husks (but corn cobs are ok) and lemon grass.

  3. 3
    What happens if these banned materials do go into the LFC? Will it damage the LFC?

    The LFC will digest large organic materials very slowly. If the occasional bone, fruit stone, or napkin goes into the LFC, it won’t cause a problem. It will disappear over a month or so. Inorganic materials won’t disappear and you need to remove them. You put the LFC into manual mode, move the arms until you see the item that needs to be removed, and stop the LFC. Then you remove it: don’t worry, the LFC is not dirty or smelly! Items that can be processed in the LFC In any case, it is unlikely that the banned material will cause a failure of the LFC. It will just remain until you remove it. We recommend that someone look inside the LFC regularly to see if there are any banned objects inside the drum. In the unlikely event that the banned object becomes stuck between the drum and the paddle, the computer of the LFC will identify a large current flow in the motor and will shut down the LFC before any damage is done.

  4. 4
    Does the LFC process fats, oils, and grease (FOG)?

    Food that is contains fats, oils, and grease is fine to go into the machine — it will be digested along with other waste food. However, you should not pour large volumes liquid fats, oils, or grease into the machine. Liquid fats and grease are too hot for the LFC and will kill the Powerzyme. They will cool an solidify fast so if you put only a few drops of hot fats and grease into the drum it may not cause too much damage. Liquid oils (whether cool or hot) may just flow through the LFC and come to the output, so you should not put it in. If you have a small amount of oil at room temperature you can add it to the drum by sprinkling it over all the Powerchips and waste food already in the drum. Items that cannot be processed in the LFC

  5. 5
    Is the LFC normally fed both waste from preparation as well as scraps coming back from uneaten food?

    Yes. However, we have many customers that feed the LFC with one type of waste food (such as just fish, or just skins of fruit). If your waste will be predominantly of one type of waste, please discuss your application with your authorized distributor or Power Knot.

  6. 6
    Can we add frozen foods to the LFC?

    No. This will cause the temperature inside the machine to drop and that will slow the decomposition significantly. Let any frozen foods thaw thoroughly to room temperature before adding them to the LFC.

  7. 7
    Can we add hot stews to the LFC?

    No. Wait until the food cools to about 50°C (120°F) before you put it into the LFC. If the waste is too hot, it will kill the microorganisms.

8 Putting Waste Food Into the LFC

  1. 1
    The pictures show someone putting the waste food into the door. Do the higher capacity models require the same approach or do they come equipped to accept input loads directly from a bin?

    All machines up to the LFC-500 are designed to be loaded by hand. We recommend that in your kitchen or food preparation area that you use 20 litre (five gallon) buckets to hold the waste food. This size of bucket can be lifted easily and emptied into the LFC. In current practice, you may be using 200 litre (50 gallon) buckets in the kitchen and empty that into an outside trash container only when it is full. The slight change in operating procedure will result in a cleaner and less smelly kitchen and reduce injuries that may happen by moving a bucket containing 200 kg (400 lb) of waste. The larger LFCs (LFC-1000 and LFC-3000) have a bin tipper.

  2. 2
    Can we get a bin tipper on the LFC-300 and LFC-500?

    No; this is not possible.

  3. 3
    What type of bins can the bin lifter accept?

    We offer bins that fit exactly the LFC-1000 and LFC-3000. These are robust bins that are designed to be lifted by a bin tipper. If you prefer to use your existing bins, we can customize the fingers on the bin lifter that can accept your bin.

9 Utilities Required

  1. 1
    Why do the larger LFCs use three phase? Can we get them in single phase?

    Three phase motors are more efficient, generate less heat and noise, and last longer. The LFC-200 is available in single phase 230 V, but it is normally supplied in 3-phase. The larger LFCs are exclusively available in 3-phase.

  2. 2
    Do the LFCs use much electricity and water?

    No. For an LFC-200, they cost about a dollar a day. Smaller machines are less and larger machines are more. The maximum amounts of water and electricity used are listed on our web site. Scroll down to Sizes, and click on USA Units or ROW Units. In practice, the amount of water and electricity consumed are typically 80% of those values listed in the table. See also section 12 on page 21.

  3. 3
    Why is water required by the machine?

    Water is used to maintain the moisture content of the waste food as it decomposes. All microorganisms need water to survive. Our LFCs are controlled by a microprocessor to optimize the process and minimize the amount of energy and water required. The default cycle is 20 minutes. For our LFC-200 (which can process up to 350 kg (770 lb) of waste food per day), the machine sprays hot water onto the waste food for 40 seconds at the start of each cycle. This uses about a gallon of water per cycle. In addition, during each cycle, the machine uses cold water to wash out the cavity. This uses about the same amount of water. So, in a day this machine uses about 520 litre (140 gallons) of water. Larger machines use more water, smaller machines use less. The default program can be modified to optimize for water temperature, pressure, type of waste food, desired pH level of output, and acceptable concentrations of BOD, TDS, TSS, and COD of the waste water.

  4. 4
    What are the ideal temperatures for the water inputs? Do we need a mixing valve externally?

    Ideally, the supply water is 35°C~50°C (95°F~120°F) so you usually plumb this to a hot water supply. If it is colder, the LFC may take longer to decompose the food. In this case, consider installing a water heater near the LFC or use a larger LFC than you would ordinarily specify. The best temperature is for the supply water that is the temperature you would use for a hot shower (40°C, 104°F). If the water is above 60°C (140°F), use an external mixing valve to mix the water with cold water before it reaches the LFC to obtain the recommended temperature. Ideally, the washout water is 15°C~75°C (59°F~165°F) so you can plumb this to a hot or cold water supply. If the water is colder, sludge may accumulate in the bottom of the drum or in the drain pipe. If the water is below 10°C (50°F), mix the water with hot water before it reaches the LFC to obtain the recommended temperature. See also question 4.4 on page 6 and question 9.7 below.

  5. 5
    Can we buy the LFC with a water heater incorporated?

    No. But you can easily purchase an in-line water heater that provides hot water instantaneously on demand (as shown to the right). These use no ac power until water is demanded by the LFC.

  6. 6
    The biodigesters from your competitors need only a cold water input. If we use the LFC it will cost more to install. Why does the LFC need hot water?

    As stated in question 4.4 on page 6, the temperature inside the drum that is ideal for the digestion of the waste food is about 42°C (108°F). If the supply water is cold, it will be always cooling the waste food and the Powerzyme will be less effective. This will slow the rate of digestion and the waste output that is discharged from the LFC will have a higher concentration of BOD, COD, TSS, and TDS. The rate of digestion can easily be halved and the concentration of the output can be doubled by providing water at 15°C (59°F) instead of 40°C (104°F).

  7. 7
    What are the requirements for water pressure and flow rate?

    The pressure supplied to the LFC must be in the range 200 to 700 kPa (29 to 100 psi, 2 to 7 kg/ cm²). The flow rate is important, too. If you have water at high pressure, but take it through a long length of pipe that has small diameter, the rate flow of water into the LFC will be reduced. Neither of the functions described in question 9.6 will function properly because there is insufficient force behind the water. For example, suppose you have high pressure of 450 kPa (65 psi, 4.5 kg/cm²) but take the water to the LFC though 10 m (30′) of pipe that is 3 mm (0.125″) diameter. The flow rate is likely to be about 2 litre/minute (0.5 gallons/minute). This is too low, even for an LFC-20. The ideal pressure is 350 kPa (50 psi, 3.5 kg/cm²) and a for the LFC-1000 the ideal flow rate is 20 litre/minute (5 gallons/minute). Smaller LFCs require the same pressure, but smaller flow rates. To achieve this flow rate, you may need to use pipes that supply the water to the LFC that are larger than those that go into the LFC. For example, on LFCs larger than the LFC-200, the pipes in your facility may need to be 19 mm (¾”) or greater.

10 Configuration and Data

  1. 1
    How do we configure the LFC?

    The LFC has a color touch screen with a modern user interface. Most customers don’t need to touch this screen: you can install the LFC, turn it on, and the default program works well.

  2. 2
    Is the touch screen easy to use?

    Yes, it is driven by a menu like a tablet or mobile phone.

  3. 3
    What data is available?

    Through the touch screen, you access all the configuration, control, status, usage data, statistics, and diagnostics. Data about the amount of waste food ingested are available numerically and graphically.

  4. 4
    What prevents an operator from making changes to the configuration?

    The setup is all protected by a password. Clearing the data is all protected by a second password.

11 Remote Monitoring

  1. 1
    How do we access the data through the cloud?

    The LFC has an ethernet port. You connect this to your LAN. Once connected, the LFC will send its data to the cloud server.

  2. 2
    Is my data secure?

    Yes, we use 64-bit data encryption approved by Google.

  3. 3
    Can I connect my PC directly to the LFC?

    No. The LFC must be connected to the internet.

  4. 4
    I can’t get an ethernet cable to the LFC. What other choices do I have?

    You can connect the LFC to a Wi-Fi router, configured as a client. Or you can use a GSM (mobile phone) router. See the image to the right.

  5. 5
    What bandwidth do we need on this connection?

    The amount of data is small, about 100 bits/second. However, if you have been using the LFC for a while prior to connecting the LFC to the cloud, it will have much data to upload and until it has completed, the usage of the bandwidth will be greater.

  6. 6
    How do I access my data?

    You can use any device that has a browser (such as Safari, Firefox, or Chrome). This means you can use any mobile phone, any tablet, or any PC. This encompasses, for example, a device that can be running Apple iOS, Google Android, Microsoft Windows, or Linux).

12 Operating Costs

  1. 1
    What items do I need to consider for annual operating costs?

    The LFC uses water and electricity and has consumable items of Powerzyme and Powerchips.

  2. 2
    Is the electricity usage large?

    No. For our largest machine (LFC-1000), the typical operating cost for electricity in the USA is under $1400 per year. When installed in a hotel, the electrical energy used by an LFC represents about 0.1% of the electricity used by the hotel.

  3. 3
    Is the water usage large?

    No. For our largest machine (LFC-1000), the typical operating cost for water in the USA is under $500 per year. When installed in a hotel, the water used by an LFC represents about 0.3% of the water used by the hotel.

  4. 4
    What is the ongoing cost for the consumable items (Powerzyme and Powerchips)?

    You need to add more dry Powerzyme every two to four months and liquid Powerzyme every nine to 18 months, depending on usage. Depending on the size of the LFC, that is about $125 (for the LFC-50) to $2500 (for the LFC-1000) when using liquid Powerzyme.1 You need to replace the Powerchips every two to four years. Depending on the size of the LFC, that is about $440 (for the LFC-50) to $8800 (for the LFC-1000). So, the average annualized cost of consumable items (after the initial items need replacing) is between $350 (for the LFC-50) to $7000 (for the LFC-1000).

  5. 5
    How do we know when to supplement the Powerzyme or change the Powerchips?

    The LFC reports when it is time to service the LFC, including when to supplement the Powerzyme or replace the Powerchips. However, you may be able to observe when these items need attention. The rate of digestion slows down when you need to supplement the Powerzyme or change the Powerchips. If the digestion has slowed and your Powerchips are less than three years old, supplement the Powerzyme. If your Powerchips are over three years old and when you last supplemented the Powerzyme the rate of digestion was not fully restored, then change the Powerchips the next time you plan to supplement the Powerzyme.

13 Impact on the Environment

  1. 1
    In what way does the use of the LFC reduce my carbon footprint compared to sending waste food to the landfill?

    When waste food is sent to the landfill, it is buried, and decomposes anaerobically, producing methane (CH4) and other gasses. That’s why landfills smell. Methane is 72 times worse for the atmosphere than carbon dioxide (CO2). It is for this reason that many jurisdictions are banning organizations from sending organic waste to the landfill. When the waste food decomposes in the LFC, it produces CO2 as part of the natural cycle of carbon (meaning it is carbon neutral). Hence, you have significantly reduced your carbon footprint.

  2. 2
    The LFC produces CO2. Isn’t this bad for the environment?

    When the food was created, it used photosynthesis and CO2 from the atmosphere to grow. That CO2 is now released back to the environment. It is a zero sum effect (referred to as the carbon cycle) and is perfectly natural, just like the leaves that decompose on the floor of a forest.

  3. 3
    How much CO2 is created by the decomposition process?

    1 kg (1 lb) of dry organic matter creates about 0.44 kg (0.44 lb) of CO2. Waste food is typically 30% dry matter and 70% water. So, 1 kg (1 lb) of wet organic matter creates about 0.13 kg (0.13 lb) of CO2. The LFC-500, digesting 500 kg (1100 lb) of waste per day will create 66 kg of CO2 per day. Ar standard atmospheric pressure, this occupies a space of 42 litres (1.5 ft³). The rate of discharge is about 1.75 litre per hour (107 in³ per hour). As a point of reference, the average adult when resting inhales (and exhales) 450 litre per hour of air. About 5% of that is oxygen that we have converted to CO2, so we typically output 23 litre of CO2 per hour.

  4. 4
    Where does the CO2 go after the waste food is decomposed?

    The amount of CO2 created by the process is minimal (see the previous question). The CO2 falls through the bottom of the drum (CO2 is heavier than air), and also escapes when the door is opened.

  5. 5
    What about methane, CH4? Isn’t that created in the process inside the LFC?

    No. The decomposition in the LFC is aerobic (see also question 1.3 and question 13.1).

  6. 6
    Are there any chemicals used in the LFC?

    No. The decomposition takes place in a natural way using microorganisms. Microorganisms are around us everywhere and are responsible for digesting all types of waste. We have a special blend of microorganisms (Powerzyme) that accelerate the decomposition of most foods. Our LFC can decompose most waste foods within 24 hours.

  7. 7
    Is the Powerzyme harmful to people or the environment?

    No. The blend of microorganisms and enzymes is safe to touch and the vapor from it is safe to inhale. The Powerzyme is non-toxic and non-hazardous. You need to take no special precautions if you accidentally spill it.

14 Product Quality and Service

  1. 1
    Where are the LFCs designed?

    The LFCs are designed and developed by Power Knot in Silicon Valley. Power Knot owns all the IP (intellectual property) and all the patents.

  2. 2
    Is the technology of the LFC proven and reliable?

    Yes. Power Knot’s joint venture company (Power Knot Korea) has been making LFC machines since 1999. The current model is the fourth generation machine and joins thousands that are already deployed.

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